Personalized Medicine

Washington, DC—Precision medicine is the optimal approach to the future of cancer care, but unless a new pricing model for innovative treatments is implemented, the cost of care will be the greatest barrier to effective treatment, said Maurie Markman, MD, President, Cancer Treatment Centers of America, and Clinical Professor of Medicine, Drexel University, Philadelphia, at the Sixth Annual Conference of the Association for Value-Based Cancer Care.
Washington, DC—Cancer is now recognized as a disease of the genome. The use of genomic assays and measurement of protein expression are permitting the use of personalized cancer therapy in the clinical setting on a scale not seen previously. In many cases, the use of these assays will also enhance the cost-effectiveness of cancer therapy, although the overall cost of cancer care may not decline as a result, said Gerald Messerschmidt, MD, FACP, Chief Medical Officer, Precision for Medicine, at the Sixth Annual Conference of the Association for Value-Based Cancer Care.

Ongoing clinical trials at academic centers around the country are testing a new strategy of matching available targeted therapies to molecular abnormalities in tumors instead of treating the cancer site.

A gene-expression signature assay called ColDx (Almac Diagnostics) successfully identified high-risk patients with stage II colon cancer who would benefit from chemotherapy, according to results of a new, prospective analysis of the previously published phase 3 Alliance C9581 clinical trial. For patients with stage I colon cancer, surgery is the treatment of choice, whereas for stage III disease, patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy. For patients with stage II disease, however, the best approach to the therapy has not been well-defined.

With better understanding of the biological underpinnings of cancer, precision medicine has evolved beyond a mere concept to an actual, real-world pursuit.
In children who are at risk for Wilms tumor, the presence of a rare genetic abnormality identifies children who can have a survival benefit from the augmentation or intensification of therapy.
In children who are at risk for Wilms tumor, the presence of a rare genetic abnormality identifies children who can have a survival benefit from the augmentation or intensification of therapy.
Gary Owens explains the importance of the oncology pharmacist as part of the oncology care team. He suggests that the role of the oncology pharmacist should evolve to have more patient interaction due to their unique knowledge of cancer drugs—their interactions, toxicities, and side effects.
Dr. Stainthorpe shares his belief that when it comes to care decisions, oncology patients should be provided with information about the benefits/outcomes/consequences and cost of their care.
Oncologists should be guided by the research that is being done around outcomes, benefit, and society impact when making value-based care decisions, says Dr. Stainthorpe.
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  •  Association for Value-Based Cancer Care
  • Value-Based Cancer Care
  • Value-Based Care in Rheumatology
  • Oncology Practice Management
  • Rheumatology Practice Management
  • Urology Practice Management
  • Inside Patient Care: Pharmacy & Clinic
  • National Association of Specialty Pharmacy
  • Lynx CME