Business

Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that affects anywhere from 1% to 18% of the world population.1-4 In the United States, the prevalence rate is estimated at 11%, which represents approximately 36 million individuals.5 Because asthma is known to occur concomitantly with allergic rhinitis and is often associated with other comorbidities and risk factors,6-9 symptoms reported by patients are multifaceted and have consequences that are inimical to work productivity and health.10-12

Medicaid Spending on Asthma Medications

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), also known as enlarged prostate, is a significant health problem among aging men.1 It affects approximately 50% of American men aged 51 to 60 years, 70% of men aged 61 to 70 years, and 90% of men aged 81 to 90 years.2 The burden of BPH on the US healthcare system is expected to grow even further as the population of men aged ≥65 years increases from 17 million in 2010 to approximately 30 million by 2030.3

Benefit Management Considerations for BPH Medications: Single Agent or Combination Therapy?

Nearly 96% of all employers allow employees and covered beneficiaries to fill medication prescriptions from either retail or mail-service pharmacy. 1 In 2009, mail-service pharmacies dispensed approximately 238 million prescriptions, representing 6.6% of the 3.6 billion prescriptions dispensed that year.2 Mailservice pharmacies have enjoyed high levels of consumer satisfaction.3 Mail-service pharmacies offer consumers the convenience of home delivery, online ordering and renewal processes, and prescriptions filled with a 90-day supply of medication.

When More Is Almost Always Better

Major depressive disorder (MDD) often presents as a chronic and recurrent illness.

Efficacy and Cost-Effectiveness: Escitalopram versus Citalopram
Re-Engineering the Healthcare Continuum: Implementing Value-Based Insurance Design to Improve Diabetes Management

Growth in specialty pharmaceuticals (including biologic therapies) continues to outpace traditional small molecules,1 and many of the newly developed specialty products will be infused. At the start of the fourth quarter of 2009, at least 19 infused specialty therapies were waiting for approval by the US Food and Drug Administration or were in phase 3 clinical trials.2 Therefore, managing the costs associated with infused therapies continues to increase in importance for private and public health insurance plans.

New Strategies Needed to Combat Increasing Costs and Optimize Use of Infused Therapies

Asthma is one of the nation’s most common, costly, and increasingly prevalent diseases. In 2008, approximately 23.3 million people had asthma in the United States, of whom 12.7 million had experienced asthma attacks.1 The economic cost of asthma for 2010 is projected at $20.7 billion, of which $15.6 billion is expected to reflect direct costs of healthcare-related expenditures (ie, hospital care, physician services, and prescription drugs).1,2

Value-Based Insurance Design: Evolving Strategies to Improve Medication Adherence, Control Healthcare Utilization

In the United States, brand-name price inflation for prescription drugs has outpaced overall prescription drug price inflation.1,2 Although certain forces in the market may account for this situation, this study focused on the lack of adequate and accurate information that is needed in the market to optimize utilization of prescription drugs and mediate costs.

Aligning Stakeholders Can Maximize the Opportunity for Cost-Savings on Drugs
We economists always think that waving money under people’s noses will make them behave according to some theoretical script. But we’ve tried that with healthcare for decades and it hasn’t worked. Healthcare isn’t just about financial incentives; it’s also about anxiety, fear, habit, guan-xi—a Chinese word that, loosely translated, means “family or business ties”—and professional pride.

Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in US women, and ranks second among cancer- related deaths in women, after lung cancer.1 It is estimated that $8.1 billion (in 2004 $US) in total healthcare costs are spent annually on breast cancer diagnosis and treatment in the United States.2 Chemotherapeutic agents represent a significant portion of the cost of breast cancer treatment, and health plans are managing these costs with care pathways and other utilization management strategies.

Can We Afford Improved Clinical Outcomes?
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Results 71 - 80 of 106
  •  Association for Value-Based Cancer Care
  • Value-Based Cancer Care
  • Value-Based Care in Rheumatology
  • Oncology Practice Management
  • Rheumatology Practice Management
  • Urology Practice Management
  • Inside Patient Care: Pharmacy & Clinic
  • Lynx CME